Testing

Testing offers a good way to ensure camel routes behave as expected over time. Before going deeper in the subject, it is strongly advised to read First Steps and Quarkus testing.

When it comes to testing a route in the context of Quarkus, the paved road is to write local integration tests. This way of doing offers the advantage of running both in JVM and native mode. The flip side is that the standard Camel testing approach with camel-test and CamelTestSupport is not supported.

Let’s enumerate below some points of interest.

A test running in JVM mode

The key point is to use the @QuarkusTest annotation that will bootstrap Quarkus and start Camel routes before the @Test logic is executed, like in the example beneath:

@QuarkusTest
class MyTest {
    @Test
    public void test() {
        // Use any suitable code that send test data to the route and then assert outcomes
        ...
    }
}

An example implementation can be found here.

A test running in native mode

Depending on the Quarkus testing features in use, running in native mode is often possible. The test logic defined in JVM mode can then be reused in native mode thanks to @NativeImageTest and inheritance as shown below:

@NativeImageTest
class MyIT extends MyTest {
   ...
}

An implementation of a native test could help to capture more details here.

A test involving containers

Involving containers could be very helpful in order to write local integration tests. For instance, one may test a route consuming from a messaging container like nats and producing to a database container like couchdb. This common pattern leverages Testcontainers and ContainerResourceLifecycleManager as shown below:

public class MyTestResource implements ContainerResourceLifecycleManager {

    private GenericContainer myContainer;

    @Override
    public Map<String, String> start() {
        // Start the needed container(s)
        myContainer = new GenericContainer(...);
        myContainer.start();
        ...
    }

    @Override
    public void stop() {
        // Stop the needed container(s)
        myContainer.stop();
        ...
    }

The defined test resource needs then to be referenced from the test classes with @QuarkusTestResource as shown below:

@QuarkusTest
@QuarkusTestResource(MyTestResource.class)
class MyTest {
   ...
}

A more concrete implementation could help to understand the subtleties here.